I’m “entitled” for wanting a career I’m passionate about

entitled

Update on the Virtual Experience: The super-discounted $199 price is going to evolve to $269 tomorrow! 

So, if you’ve been meaning to join us but have been procrastinating (understandable), then head on over and make it official if saving $$ is something you’re interested in.

A plus, though, for anyone who doesn’t get it on the early-bird discount: You’ll be able to split the entire $269 payment in two installments of $139. We did promise that it’d be affordable, yes?

Enrollment is closing on September 27th (we’ll be doing it again, but not until 2015).

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And now, Kristen talks about a word we’re sure you’ve never heard before (*insert sarcasm*): “Entitled.”

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If you’ve spent any time at all in a boring, unfulfilling, or straight-up terrible job, and you’ve spent hours half-heartedly job searching (and feeling even worse afterward), then you’ve probably had at least one of these thoughts:

  • “Maybe I should just suck it up and try to like this job, because I’m lucky to have a job at all in this economy … even if it’s one I don’t like.”
  • “I want to be passionate about my career, but that’s probably not realistic. Most people don’t love their job, and I need to accept that.”
  • “Why can’t I be like everyone else I know and just be satisfied with going to work and collecting my paycheck?”
  • “It’s impossible to do something I love AND make enough money, so I should just settle for something that pays the bills.”

I’ve heard these kinds of thoughts from countless Millennials in the past, and I recently got an email from a client (someone who just joined the Virtual Experience!) who summed it up perfectly:

“I start hearing myself and listen to how spoiled I sound trying to go after this ideal ‘passionate’ imaginary job role, when I just need to accept real life, celebrating a job that pays your bills.”

I always get a little sad when I hear these same things over and over, but mostly it fires me up — THIS is why Rachel and I built an entire business around helping Millennials figure out and live their passion.

It makes sense, of course, why so many of us get to this point of reluctantly feeling like we need to settle for something not-so-great. Millennials are forever being told that we’re “entitled” and that we should just “be grateful to have a job at all.”

Guess what? You can simultaneously be grateful for what you have now and still want more.

I’m going to say this once and for all:

YOU ARE NOT SPOILED, ENTITLED, OR SELFISH FOR WANTING TO BE PASSIONATE ABOUT YOUR CAREER (AND LIFE).

Feeling inspired, fulfilled, and passionate about your day-to-day life (in which your job takes up a LOT of time) is not some childish dream you need to give up.

You’re meant to enjoy how you spend your days AND be able to provide for yourself.

Because otherwise, what’s the point?

When you’re bored, miserable, or unhappy at work, then you don’t have the energy or motivation to be as good of an employee, team member, friend, family member, or leader as you’re capable of being.

I’d call that a complete lose-lose situation. You’re suffering, and therefore everyone around you is suffering, too.

WHEN YOU START LIVING A PASSION-FILLED LIFE, YOU RAISE UP EVERYONE AROUND YOU.

And yes, it’s really possible to live a passion-filled life … once you get the clarity about what you really want and what you’re willing to do to get there.

So how do you start getting that clarity in the first place?

First of all, keep in mind that your interests and strengths are unique and not accidental. {Side note: Your strengths and interests don’t always overlap, either.}

I’ve coached hundreds of Millennials at this point, and I’ve never met two who wanted the exact same things in their career. Your talents and goals are unique, and by brushing them aside to do something “realistic” that you don’t love, you’re actually doing the world a disservice (not to mention yourself).

If you’re drawn to a particular industry, company, location, group of people, or creative pursuit … don’t write that off as a pipe dream. Stop telling yourself (or believing others when they tell you) all the reasons why your dreams are invalid. Instead, start asking, “HOW can I make this happen?” You’ll be surprised by the creative solutions your brain will start conjuring up.

And if you still need help figuring out your passion and making a solid, reliable plan, then maybe this is the right time for you to sign up for our Passion Plan Virtual Experience. That’s literally the entire point of the program, and you even have the chance to add some one-on-one coaching (if you want individual support) at a lower rate.

I’ll be straight-up with you right now, though. Figuring out and then following your passion may require some risks, investments (financial or otherwise), short-term sacrifices, disappointing people, and leaping into the unknown.

“Most people will choose unhappiness over uncertainty.” – Tim Ferriss

Following your passion isn’t always the easy path … but it’s the only option I’m willing to accept.

Are you with me? Leave a comment to let me know!

Much Love,

Kristen + Rachel

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