How to create more time in your day

side chats

We’ve never liked those mugs that say, “You’ve got the same number of hours in the day as Beyoncé {or Oprah}.”

We don’t know about you, but if either of us had the resources that those ladies do, then we wouldn’t be spending time doing anything we didn’t feel like doing — cooking, laundry, driving, managing our business. We’d outsource almost everything.

We all technically have the same hours in the day as everyone else, but sometimes other people can leverage time in ways we just can’t.

So how do the non-mega-millionaires like us create more time, when we can’t snap our fingers and have someone else do stuff for us?

We’re sharing the answer to that question in a brand new side chat.

We’re talking about …

  • The way most of us are thinking about time and why it never works;
  • Our formula for doing fewer hours of work and still netting more productivity;
  • How relaxing and enjoying your life can lead to getting way more done;
  • Stories about how us and our clients create more time on a regular basis;
  • And more, of course!

It’s about 25 minutes, which is the perfect length for your commute, a walk, or a break from the office. You can either play it right here on the page or download and save it for later.

{Press play to listen now or download by clicking the arrow in the top right corner.}

And after you’ve listened, we want to hear from you! Leave a comment below to share your answer to a question we asked at the very end of the conversation.

MORE GOOD STUFF TO HELP WITH THIS

Here are some past side chats we mentioned during this conversation that will help you create more time in your day and get more done with less effort:

How to live more and work less.

How to survive a job you hate, while trying to get out ASAP.

NEVER HEARD OF SIDE CHATS?

As you can imagine when two best friends run a business together, there’s SO MUCH MORE good stuff — insights, revelations, struggles — that we’re talking about behind the scenes than what you’re reading in blog posts.

Our random back-and-forth conversations — while we’re supposed to be “working,” while we’re eating tacos, while we’re chilling in sweatpants on the couch — aren’t planned at all, and that’s why they’re good … anything can and does come up.

We always find ourselves having these good conversations and thinking, “It’d be cool if people could listen in to this, fly-on-the-wall style.”

So, we decided to just press “record” and start sharing with you.

We’re calling these “Clarity on Fire Side Chats,” and there’s no big plan for them. When inspiration hits, which is usually at random, we’ll press record and share another with you. The freer it flows, the better it usually is, anyway!

Want to catch up on previous Side Chats? Check out the archive.

Enjoy!

Much Love,

Kristen + Rachel

2 Comments // ADD COMMENT

2 comments

  • Leah Renter

    Sounds like someone’s been listening to the Lively Show too. My new year’s resolution/goal was to use my attention to focus on the positive to attract more positive. One thing I’m struggling with – how do you get into the right frequency without overthinking it. Trying to flow with more ease while still being intentional. Practical tips to balance the two are welcome. Thanks!

    • Kristen Walker

      Hey Leah! While we’re definite fans of Jess Lively, we actually didn’t even know she’d talked about this on her show recently. Rachel and I have been exploring this concept for years now and learning from various teachers, and — more than anything — we’re just glad it’s now becoming a more “mainstream” topic to talk about! 🙂

      You asked such great questions — I could probably write an entire blog post giving my two cents about maintaining that balance (and maybe I will at some point!). But here’s just one thing to consider: Part of maintaining positivity, ease, and flow (despite overthinking things and wanting to stay grounded and intentional) is being OK when you’re NOT feeling positive or in the flow. It’s counterintuitive, I know. But there’s no such thing as being positive all of the time, and trying to force that actually creates unnecessary pressure and resistance. So if you could find a way to accept that negativity is totally OK sometimes and not try to fight it, you would (ironically) feel more positive. Plus, that approach frees up a lot of mental clutter, since you’re not trying to constantly “think” your way back into feeling good. Something to noodle over, at least! Let me know what you think.