Making friends in adulthood with Shannon Egan & Inés Battistini

friends

Click the play button below, or subscribe and listen through our podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or Spotify.


A few weeks ago, we hosted a live online workshop about getting what you want in 2020. In typical fashion, the two of us were bouncing ideas and insights and jokes back and forth, and had a great time (and hopefully enlightened a couple of people, too). But something that one of our attendees commented on stayed with us long after the hour was over. She said:

“I have never had a female interaction like you two have. It’s wonderful to see, totally alien to me! 🙁 That bond is so powerful and affirming. Thank you for being who you are, and doing that side by side.”

She was 100% right. Having really solid friendships is powerful and life-affirming! And if we could, we’d wave a magic wand over all of you and grant you at least one soulmate-level-platonic-life-partner.

But since we can’t manage that, we decided to whip out the big guns (or big wands, as it were):

We’re doubling down by bringing another dynamic duo on the podcast to talk about all things friendship: Our friends Shannon Egan & Inés Battistini, who are BFFs and co-founders of The Biz Sisterhood!

Join Krachel and Shanés as we get into…

  • How Shannon & Inés were “love at first sight,” but Kristen & Rachel were more “meh” at first sight.
  • Taking friendships from tentative, excited, new friends to soulmate-level-BFFs.
  • Navigating messy, complicated feelings and disagreements between friends.
  • How to tell if someone has the potential to become a deep, authentic, lifelong connection.
  • Where to go to find potential friends if you’re struggling to meet people.

After you listen, leave a comment below to share your feelings about making friends in adulthood!


GET TEXTS FROM CLARITY ON FIRE!

Want to get weekly texts from us? Sign up here, OR … text your first name followed by your email address (Example: Hermione hgranger@hogwarts.edu) to 703-783-3223.

MORE ABOUT SHANNON & INÉS

Inés Battistini & Shannon Egan are on a mission to help female entrepreneurs boost their productivity & manage their time, so they can get things done & achieve their BIG goals without burning out in the process!

When Inés & Shannon first became entrepreneurs, they struggled to be productive, stay motivated, and get results. But when they started co-working together, magic happened! That’s why they created The Biz Sisterhood — a community of Girl Bosses supporting each other on their entrepreneurial journeys. They believe you have what it takes to build a thriving business doing work that you love with less overwhelm and more ease!

Follow them @thebizsisterhood on IG

Take The Girl Boss Quiz

LINKS

Take the Passion Profile Quiz

Submit your question for a future episode of Dear Krachel

Check out our YouTube channel

2 Comments // ADD COMMENT

2 comments

  • Samantha

    Ah yes I have so many thoughts on this topic! Our society can really romantasise friendship just like we can overly romantasise relationships, especially if they’re friendships from childhood. I have friends who are hanging onto really unhealthy friendships because ‘we’ve been friends since kindergarten’ – ummm haven’t you evolved a bit since you were four years old? Or is your number one concern still about who likes to play in the sandpit? Haha I really like how Lena Dunham’s Girls also challenged the sex and the city girl gang fantasy, the series starts with four girlfriends but at the end of the series *spoiler alert* they are not all friends. Two of the four remain close friends, a third stays more of a casual friend and the fourth decides to break up with them because she doesn’t want to be their friend anymore. Much more realistic I feel!

    • Rachel East

      I’d never seen the end of Girls, so I’m glad to know that’s how they wrapped it up! It’s far more realistic. And as someone who has none of the same friends from when I was 18 or younger (and Kristen’s the only one I’d had since I was still technically a teenager), I completely agree that friendship does not have to be lifelong! It’s natural to phase out of friendships, and you’re right that we overly romanticize them.